Aaron Lopresti

Aaron Lopresti

Aaron was born in a log cabin that his father built…no wait, that’s not right.

Yes it is! Well, except for the log cabin. Actually, it was just a regular house. But I digress.

Born in Portland, OR at the young age of 0, Aaron knew almost immediately what he wanted to be when he grew up. When the whole pro basketball thing didn’t work out, Aaron instead turned to art.

Despite graduating high school in the top 10 percent of his class, Aaron showed almost no intelligence by choosing to go to business school instead of art school. After spending a year at Oregon State University under-achieving, Aaron left the campus lifestyle to pursue his second love, film.

With two years of community college and a much higher GPA under his belt, Aaron loaded up his Dad’s 1963 Mercury Comet and headed to film school at the prestigious USC film school in Los Angeles.

Aaron spent two moderately successful years in film school and another year reading scripts for Tri-Star Pictures. Three years in Los Angeles proved to be plenty and he once again loaded up the car and drove straight back to his mommy.

This tragic story does get better. Soon after returning to Portland, Aaron found work as a commercial artist in training at the now defunct Art Farm Studios. Aaron spent the next three years learning there what he could’ve learned if he had gone to art school in the first place!

Aaron’s first big break came in 1993 when Publisher Dave Olbrich and Editor-in-Chief Chris Ulm hired Aaron to draw Sludge for Malibu’s new Ultraverse comic line. One thing led to another and soon Aaron had a full blown career in comics.

Aaron’s career in commercial and comic art has continued on for more than 12 years. In that time Aaron has worked on a wide variety of characters including: Spiderman The X-men, The Hulk, The Avengers, Batman, Plastic Man, Green Lantern, Superboy, Xena, Star Trek, Gen 13, Mystic, and the self published Atomic Toybox (just to name a few). In 1995 he founded the successful comic art studio, Studiosaurus that lasted until 1998.

Aaron lists his art influences in two categories, comic and illustration. His comic fluences are: Frazetta, Berni Wrightson, Neal Adams, Michael Golden, Steranko, Brian Bolland, and anyone else who is good. Illustrators who have influenced Aaron over the years are: Frazetta(again), James Bama, William Stout, JC Leyendecker, Brian Froud, Robert McGinnis and Chuck Jones.

Some of Aaron’s favorite contemporary artists would include: Adam Hughes, Travis Charest, Mark Schultz, Mike Ploog, Peter DeSeve, Krueger, Walt Simonson, Alan Davis, Barry Smith, Chris Ayers, Claire Wendling, Dave Johnson, Rudy Nebres and Alex Nino.

Aaron spends most of his time these days drawing comics, painting, writing, enjoying his wife (Shelley) and two children (Josh and Samantha), and being jealous of his friends from film school who are now rich and famous.